Canada Kicks Ass
ICBC Sucks!

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Robair @ Tue May 22, 2012 6:05 pm

westmanguy wrote:
This isn't said easily for me as a Conservative, but the public monopoly in Manitoba was legit a great crown corporation...it was very cheap and reasonable.

Same with SGI.
Plus in Sasky, no fault insurance. (Maybe MB does that too?)

Cuts out the lawyers.

Wouldn't be suprised if There has never been a better system.

   



SprCForr @ Tue May 22, 2012 6:19 pm

Wow, DBR you're paying double what I do and I have twice the vehicles you do. Damn!

   



dino_bobba_renno @ Tue May 22, 2012 6:52 pm

SprCForr wrote:
Wow, DBR you're paying double what I do and I have twice the vehicles you do. Damn!


Please don't rub it in :lol:

And we both have clean driving records to boot. Ya my vehicles are newer, well one is any ways, but I shopped around it was one of the better rates I found. Who are you dealing with?

   



westmanguy @ Tue May 22, 2012 9:27 pm

Robair wrote:
westmanguy wrote:
This isn't said easily for me as a Conservative, but the public monopoly in Manitoba was legit a great crown corporation...it was very cheap and reasonable.

Same with SGI.
Plus in Sasky, no fault insurance. (Maybe MB does that too?)

Cuts out the lawyers.

Wouldn't be suprised if There has never been a better system.


Yep, Manitoba Public Insurance (MPI) is no-fault insurance as-well. Very reasonable rates and now lawyer bs.

   



SprCForr @ Wed May 23, 2012 10:31 am

dino_bobba_renno wrote:
SprCForr wrote:
Wow, DBR you're paying double what I do and I have twice the vehicles you do. Damn!


Please don't rub it in :lol:

And we both have clean driving records to boot. Ya my vehicles are newer, well one is any ways, but I shopped around it was one of the better rates I found. Who are you dealing with?


Aviva, I think. It's through Western Financial Group. I had a peek at the policy and it isn't half it's three quarters. The Impala alone costs me $400 a year. I won't do classic insurance because of the restrictions.

   



Robair @ Thu Sep 01, 2016 8:39 pm

ICBC No. 1 - in cost

Quote:
By Dermod Travis

It's here somewhere...

Licence, car registration fees to drop 35 per cent in 2016. No, that's Quebec.

Average passenger vehicle owner would pay an additional $17 a year in premiums. Nope, that's Manitoba.

Auto Fund rate stabilization reserve hits $377 million – highest ever, $65 million profit in 2015. No, that's Saskatchewan.

Here it is: ICBC applying for basic rate increase of 4.9 per cent.

Vastly different story lines among Canada's four public auto insurers.

Just like ICBC's mishmash of eight different date-to-date comparisons in its news release last week in support of the corporation's rate application. Cherry picked to suit, actual dollars cited when useful, percentages when not, but no ratios since they wouldn't be helpful at all.

There's an eerie sense of deja vu to the release.

Example: “The external pressures on insurance rates in B.C. are very real and they’re accelerating, including an escalation in the number of crashes, the number of claims being filed and the cost of settling those claims."

Here's what ICBC said in 2002 to justify its then rate application: “Claims costs are up, with no sign of relief to come... These trends show no sign of abating.”

According to its release, the number of crashes across B.C. “jumped by 15 per cent in two years from 260,000 in 2013 to 300,000 in 2015.”

Why 2013 and not some other year, say 2007? The numbers wouldn't fit the narrative.

In 2007, there were 281,000 crashes, reducing the jump to 6.8 per cent over nine years, but that's just part of it.

Back then, there were three million active driver licences in B.C. In 2014, 3.28 million (latest year posted to ICBC's website).

Take the number of crashes per 100,000 active driver licences and that jump turns to a drop, falling from 9,341 crashes for every 100,000 licences to 9,146 in 2015 (using the undoubtedly lower 2014 licence stat).

Against policies in force – up 25 per cent since 2007 – the ratio would drop even more.

They dip for injuries and fatalities as well.

According to Transport Canada, there were 13.9 fatalities per 100,000 licensed drivers in B.C. in 2007 and 8.9 in 2014. The injury rate dropped from 864.2 to 644.7.

When it comes to cost controls, ICBC was quite emphatic in 2002: “ICBC has reduced its controllable costs by 22 per cent and has reduced its costs substantially, so further savings will be much smaller.”

No kidding.

Last week, ICBC trumpeted the fact its “executive team has decreased from 11 members in 2012 to just eight today. In 2015, total executive compensation was 46 per cent lower than it was in 2011.”

No actual dollars, just a percentage.

Relying on ICBC's executive compensation filings, the corporation's top five salaries totalled $2.2 million in 2011 and $1.83 million in 2015, a difference of $366,930.

That's sure to put a dent – no pun intended – into the corporation's costs. It's also irrelevant.

As ICBC's media spokesperson Adam Grossman put it to the Vancouver Sun in 2014: “(managerial) cuts are unlikely to result in lower rates for customers, those are mainly driven by injury claims costs, which total about $2 billion each year.”

At least two of the corporation's senior executives are being paid to stay at home, part of the 390 severance agreements ICBC has signed with non-union staff between 2009 and 2015, each for between two to 18 months.

Despite those cuts, employee salaries and benefits rose 6.7 per cent to $395.9 million between 2007 and 2015, payments to suppliers of goods and services rose 38.9 per cent to $215.9 million and claims by 29.5 per cent to $3.3 billion.

ICBC is now on a hiring spree to cope with its self-inflicted backlog of claims and plans to add another 180 claims positions to its 4,700 employees.

Back in 2002, ICBC was put under the government's microscope. According to the core review's findings: “It is clear that decisions regarding auto insurance rates and operations should be based on sound business principles and not political considerations.”

Funny coincidence. In 2005 and 2009 – both election years – the rate increases at ICBC were zero.

ICBC is tops in one area among Canada's four public insurers: highest premiums.

– Dermod Travis is the executive director of IntegrityBC.

   



BeaverFever @ Thu Sep 01, 2016 8:58 pm

Image

   



Strutz @ Thu Sep 01, 2016 9:19 pm

No kidding!

Wild to skim through the pages and see names I haven't seen around here for ages though!

Makes me wonder how some of those folks are doing these days...

   



Robair @ Fri Sep 02, 2016 10:08 am

ICBC has applied to rape and pillage some more. :x

Just did a search for ICBC instead of starting a new thread.

   



Brenda @ Sat Sep 03, 2016 5:48 pm

ICBC suck donkey balls!
Another year of clean driving, no accidents, no tickets.
I pay more after renewal this week than I paid last month.

My kid was SO proud of her 10% discount she was going to get. She drives an old Chevy Cavallier, nothing fancy. She's 18, paid $115. Now, after a year of clean driving on her N, and her 10% discount, she pays $114.80.
Ugh. Assholes.

   



andyt @ Sat Sep 03, 2016 5:57 pm

Everything goes up, why shouldn't insurance. We have more cars on the roads that are way more expensive to fix and with more and more idiots on their phones instead of watching where they are going. The only complaint I have is with the govt bleeding ICBC every year for their "premium" but hey, it lets them keep taxes low.

   



lazarus102 @ Tue Sep 11, 2018 9:23 am

You think BC is bad, try living in Ontario as a new driver... I would have literally had to pay 400 per month on insurance as a new driver. BC isn't that bad. I've got an accident on my record and still only pay 600$ for 6 months for my motorcycle here.

   



Robair @ Fri Mar 22, 2019 9:45 am

ICBC gouging drivers?

Image

Quote:
The Canadian Taxpayers Federation has added their voice to growing outrage over a study that shows B.C. drivers are paying hundreds of dollars more for auto insurance than Alberta drivers.

“It’s totally unfair that B.C. drivers are paying way more than our cousins in Alberta, why should we keep getting ripped off like this?” said Kris Sims, B.C. Director of the Canadian Taxpayers Federation. “Because ICBC is a government-controlled monopoly, it can gouge drivers every year without losing any of its trapped customers – this has to change. B.C. drivers need the choice to shop around for car insurance.”

The study which sparked the outrage was conducted for the Insurance Bureau of Canada and it compared insurance costs for B.C. drivers to those in Alberta.

The study shows a middle-aged male driver in B.C. pays $2,058 to insure a Ford F-150 while the same driver in Alberta pays $1,399 for the same coverage; $659 less per year.

The study shows that premiums for recreational vehicles are up to three times higher in B.C. than Alberta and motorcycle premiums are as much as 11 times higher.

According to data from ICBC and the General Insurance Statistical Agency (a statistical agency created and overseen by provincial insurance regulators), B.C. drivers pay the highest auto insurance prices in Canada, with annual premiums averaging $1,680.

Current reforms in B.C. are not expected to reduce prices. In fact, ICBC is forecast to increase prices by nearly 25% over the next three years, beginning with the 6.3% basic rate increase on April 1, 2019.


:evil: Yup. Now if you really want to open eyes, compare it to the cost in SK.

   



Robair @ Tue Oct 29, 2019 8:01 am

ICBC dumpster fire rages on

Quote:
As ICBC's "financial dumpster fire" continues to burn and many motorists grapple with higher insurance rates, staff at the Crown corporation don't appear to be sharing the burden.

Documents show almost twice as many employees at ICBC made more than $150,000 last year, compared to the previous fiscal year, CTV News reports.

In total, 93 staff made more than $150,000 during the fiscal year ended March 31. Forty-seven hit that income level in 2016-17.

That number jumped to 148 employees in 2017-18 before cutbacks were implemented.

"British Columbians should have steam coming out of their ears right about now," BC Liberal MLA Jas Johal told CTV. "There's absolutely no way, no way you can justify that kind of increase."

ICBC paid out $407,869,644 in salaries during 2017-18, and $422,691,574 in 2018-19.

   



N_Fiddledog @ Tue Oct 29, 2019 1:59 pm

On the news a few months back they were telling us our insurance was going up again if there was any kind of fender-bender on your record. Apparently you can look on line to see how much extra you'll be paying.

I'm afraid to look. I got stung by one of those 'Diversity is our strength' moms that drive around parking lots with a van load of grandmothers in the passenger seats, looking for somebody who's backing up that they can zip in behind.

I back up so slow and careful I couldn't believe there was a scratch. There wasn't on my car. She found a big dint on hers though, and because I was backing up, now I have to worry about this added increase coming this year. I was fine last year during which time it happened but looks like ICBC wants a pound of flesh just for a bump this year.

In the meantime we get American TV commercials and I listen to them bragging about first-time accident forgiveness.

Never did like government driver's insurance. I'm willing to join the revolution anytime somebody wants to start one on that issue. We BCers took down a suggested new tax once before. Don't see why we can't do it again.

   



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