Canada Kicks Ass
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Fighter @ Thu Apr 04, 2019 4:44 am

N_Fiddledog N_Fiddledog:

Pretty pictures in your video though, Fighter.


:D

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Battle of Moscow 1941 - Nazi Germany vs Soviet Union [HD]



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Fighter @ Thu Apr 04, 2019 4:46 am

World War II justified by former German soldiers

   



Fighter @ Sun Apr 14, 2019 11:04 am

The mother of all troubles...here it began, about which we are still crying

Iraq invasion: the defining images



Kissinger referred pointedly to military men as “dumb, stupid animals to be used” as pawns for foreign policy

I don't know whether Kissinger really made that remark or not......but this is just so true, especially when applied to countries with high defense budget and powerful military...They really use their soldiers for political shit....Pakistanis have seen this, here in South Asia....India just did that in February.

   



Fighter @ Sun Apr 21, 2019 5:11 am

I’ve Been to War But I Cannot Imagine the Hell That Was Stalingrad

World War II's most terrifying tale.

by Daniel L. Davis

After the Red Army stopped the Nazis at the Volga, they would push the Germans back, relentlessly, for the next two years, culminating with the destruction of Berlin, the death of Adolf Hitler and the end of the war.

Since July 2012, the world has watched in horror as the once-beautiful and vibrant Syrian city of Aleppo has been transformed into a perpetual battlefield. Those killed in Aleppo, as well as throughout the rest of Syria during the civil war, are reported to be approximately 300,000.

During the U.S.-led war in Iraq from 2003–11, one study reported that 405,000 Iraqis were killed directly and indirectly as a result of the war, and from 2001–15, an additional 91,991 people were killed due to war in Afghanistan, for a three-country total, over a 15-year period, of 796,991.

As staggering as the death toll in these wars have been, it pales in comparison to what remains the world’s most barbaric city fight, the Battle of Stalingrad, in which an incomprehensible 1.9 million German and Soviet soldiers and civilians are estimated to have been killed in six months.

In June 1941 Hitler ordered a surprise invasion of the Soviet Union, and for most of the next year the German army routed the Soviet troops, capturing thousands of square kilometers of their country in the process.

In August 1942 the German Sixth Army had pushed all the way to the banks of the Volga River, near the industrial heartland of the USSR. Once captured, the Nazis could sever the Volga, and potentially destroy Moscow’s ability to continue fighting.

All they had to do was take one more city. Stalingrad.

The pre-war population of Stalingrad was 400,000. It was home to a key river port as well as numerous important war and civilian industries. Because the city bore the name of the leader of the USSR, Joseph Stalin, Hitler took particular interest in capturing the city as a personal hit on the Soviet leader.

Stalin likewise placed great importance on holding the city to prevent Hitler from capturing the city carrying his name.

Though Stalingrad carried significant military importance, the psychological emphasis both leaders placed on the city elevated it to a level of importance above perhaps even the capital city of Moscow. The price both armies were willing to pay to possess it transcended military utility and entered fully into the category of obsession.

Initially the Germans made substantial and rapid progress in conquering Stalingrad. The Nazis attacked the city and its defenders with almost uncontested bombardment from the sky, tanks, artillery, mortars and other heavy weapons. By early September 1942 the Germans were still making progress, but the rate of advance had slowed considerably.


As a result of the enormous bombardment, the city and its buildings had been pulverized into one giant heap of rubble. The Soviets began to develop defensive tactics that took advantage of the wrecked buildings, which ironically gave them advantages.

Nevertheless, by November the relentless German assault had pushed the Soviet line almost all the way to the Volga River. Both sides had endured hundreds of thousands of casualties at this point, and the barbarity of the fighting on both sides of the line had transcended all bounds of human behavior.


Right and wrong, morality and honor among combatants had ceased to exist. The battle had literally descended into an animalistic struggle to survive.

The 2001 Hollywood movie Enemy at the Gates depicted a duel between a specific German and Russian sniper. Snipers had become one of the most feared opponents for both sides. Due to their ability to fire from long ranges, soldiers never felt they were safe and often were shot even in areas they thought to be secure.


One particular Russian sniper, Anatoly Chechov, said of the time he took his first human life, “I felt terrible. I had killed a human being.”

But after time and the knowledge of how German troops had killed many of his countrymen, Chechov said when interviewed during the battle, “I started to mercilessly fire on them. I’ve become a barbaric person, I kill them. I hate them.”


To give just a glimpse into the Hell of the world that was the battle of Stalingrad, consider these few stories from both countries’ perspectives.

As described in detail in the excellent book by Michael K. Jones, Stalingrad: How the Red Army Survived the German Onslaught, on Sept. 14, 1942, the Germans had pushed almost all the way through the city to the Volga, a mere 200 yards from their objective. The Soviets were on the verge of defeat.


Because the German Luftwaffe had air supremacy in the skies, it was near suicide for any reinforcements or resupply to be ferried over the Volga during daylight. But because the Soviet commander of the 13th Guards Division believed that the Russian defenders near the river’s edge would not hold out until nightfall, he ordered his division to cross anyway, believing the battle and perhaps the war was on the line.

Gen. Alexander Rodimtsev led his troops onto the barges and started across the river. According to eyewitness accounts, the general’s boat was hit with a German bomb before reaching the far shore, killing most on board — but miraculously, he survived. Most of his men were not so lucky.


Albert Burkovski, one of the few Soviet defenders still holding on the Stalingrad side of the river, described the approach of the 13th Guards Division troops. “We were lying on the ground. Everything was on fire,” he said.


“The boats were being bombed and shelled. I saw a big barge — full of soldiers, with their big coats, grenades, sapper’s spades, ammunition and machine guns — go down right before my eyes.”

Another defender, Ivan Schylaev, described a similar horrifying scene.

“There was a flash of flame, dark smoke enveloped the ferry, an explosion was heard, and immediately afterwards, a drawling scream … The ship was maneuvering, then a sheet of fire erupted on the upper decks; the force of the explosion shook the Volga. When it was over — and the smoke had cleared away — there was nothing, just waves where the ferry had been. The scene froze our blood.”

As Michael Jones noted, the Soviet troops shouldn’t have been able to hold the line. “The Germans occupied the high river embankment and brought overwhelming firepower to bear on the advancing Russians,” he wrote. “It did not seem possible that they could succeed — and yet they did. In ferocious hand-to-hand combat, Rodimtsev’s soldiers recaptured a key building from the Germans and secured the river crossing.”

For a graphic depiction of this action, see this excerpt from the 2013 Russian movie Stalingrad. The view from the German side was even more horrific.

In a WW2History.com interview, German survivor Helmut Walz described the dehumanizing effects inflicted on him during the house-to-house fighting in Stalingrad. Walz was in the midst of an assault on a certain Russian-held building when he came face to face with an enemy soldier.

He said he raised his weapon to shoot, but all of a sudden, “I saw little stars in front of my eyes. I looked to my right, and I ran my left hand over my face and a jet of blood comes out and my teeth flew out of my mouth.”

He thought, “Now it’s all over,” and expected the Russian soldier to finish him off. But then one of his friends came to his aid and “crushed the head of the Russian who had shot me. He crushed his head despite the steel helmet he was wearing, right into the middle of his face. That made such a cracking noise, I can still hear it today.”

But his horror for the day wasn’t finished. As his friend bandaged Walz’s wounds, Walz looked up and tried to warn the friend that another Russian fighter was right behind him. But it was too late.

Shots rang out and his friend’s helmet “flew through the air and then I looked at him and I saw how he was shot in his head and how his head split. That’s the first time I saw a brain. On the left-hand side and on the right hand side there were parts of the brain, and in the middle there was water. No blood, but water. And he looked at me and he was standing on the soil with his wound.”

Scenes like those of the 13th Guards Division and Helmut Walz were repeated a thousand times over during the six months of the battle for Stalingrad.

I fought in high intensity combat during my 21-year military career, as well as participating in counterinsurgency operations against guerrilla foes. Yet without equivocation I confess that I cannot fathom, cannot even truly imagine, what the living Hell of Stalingrad combat must have been like.

It is frightening to consider how remorseless and vicious men can become when stripped of their humanity.


The carnage of the Battle of Stalingrad finally came to an end in February 1943, when the German Sixth Army Commander, Gen. Friedrich Paulus, surrendered the remaining 90,000 troops of his army to the Soviet forces.

After the Red Army stopped the Nazis at the Volga, they would push the Germans back, relentlessly, for the next two years, culminating with the destruction of Berlin, the death of Adolf Hitler and the end of the war.


Of the 90,000 Germans that went into Soviet captivity, fewer than 6,000 would live to see their homeland again, and those didn’t come until the mid-1950s.

However bad and inhumane we believe the wars in the Middle East have been for the past five years — and they have been horrific, especially for the poor civilians caught in the middle — they are a mere shadow of wars past.

May those shadows never return.

Daniel L. Davis is a retired U.S. Army colonel who served multiple tours in Afghanistan. He is a senior fellow with Defense Priorities. Follow him on Twitter at @DanielLDavis1.

This article by Daniel L. Davis originally appeared at War is Boring in 2016.

https://nationalinterest.org/blog/i%E2%80%99ve-been-war-i-cannot-imagine-hell-was-stalingrad-52322

During the siege of Stalingrad first the farm animals started disappearing: cows, goats, horses, sheep, chickens etc, then dogs and cats disappeared, then the rats and mice started being eaten , then chunks of dead bodies went missing and then children started going missing. People who were once living the city life were transformed into natures battle of survival of the fittest; all religious and humanity cloaks were shed as people were transgressed into the basic fight for life.

This comment above is not mine.....but touched me deeply.

   



Fighter @ Wed May 01, 2019 11:55 am

   



Fighter @ Wed May 01, 2019 11:59 am

Original D-Day footage US Troops storming the Beaches of Normandy

   



llama66 @ Wed May 01, 2019 12:32 pm

Canadian's coming ashore on D-Day

   



Fighter @ Wed May 01, 2019 12:38 pm

Canadian Army Newsreel, No 69 1945

   



xerxes @ Mon May 20, 2019 9:45 am

Trump May Be Preparing Pardons for Servicemen Accused of War Crimes

$1:
President Trump has indicated that he is considering pardons for several American military members accused or convicted of war crimes, including high-profile cases of murder, attempted murder and desecration of a corpse, according to two United States officials.

The officials said that the Trump administration had made expedited requests this week for paperwork needed to pardon the troops on or around Memorial Day.

One request is for Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher of the Navy SEALs, who is scheduled to stand trial in the coming weeks on charges of shooting unarmed civilians and killing an enemy captive with a knife while deployed in Iraq.

The others are believed to include the case of a former Blackwater security contractor recently found guilty in the deadly 2007 shooting of dozens of unarmed Iraqis; the case of Maj. Mathew L. Golsteyn, the Army Green Beret accused of killing an unarmed Afghan in 2010; and the case of a group of Marine Corps snipers charged with urinating on the corpses of dead Taliban fighters.

The officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly, said they had not seen a complete list, and did not know if other service members were included in the request for pardon paperwork.

The White House sent requests on Friday to the Justice Department’s Office of the Pardon Attorney, which alerted the military branches, according to one senior military official. Pardon files include background information and details on criminal charges, and in many cases include letters describing how the person in question has made amends.

The official said while assembling pardon files typically takes months, the Justice Department stressed that all files would have to be complete before Memorial Day weekend, because the President planned to pardon the men then. A second United States official confirmed the request concerning Chief Gallagher.

The military branches referred questions to the Justice Department, which declined to comment on the matter.

Mr. Trump has often bypassed traditional channels in granting pardons and wielded his power freely, sometimes in politically charged cases that resonate with him personally, such as the conviction of the former Arizona sheriff Joe Arpaio. Earlier this month, the president pardoned former Army First Lt. Michael Behenna, who had been convicted of killing an Iraqi during an interrogation in 2008.

For Me, He Was Willing to Face His Worst Fear
While the requests for pardon files are a strong sign of the president’s plans, Mr. Trump has been known to change his mind and it is not clear what the impetus was for the requests. But most of the troops who are positioned for a pardon have been championed by conservative lawmakers and media organizations, such as Fox News, which have portrayed them as being unfairly punished for trying to do their job. Many have pushed for the president to intervene. The White House declined to comment.

Pardoning several accused and convicted war criminals at once, including some who have not yet gone to trial, has not been done in recent history, legal experts said. Some worried that it could erode the legitimacy of military law and undercut good order and discipline in the ranks.

“These are all extremely complicated cases that have gone through a careful system of consideration. A freewheeling pardon undermines that whole system,” said Gary Solis, a retired military judge and armor officer who served in Vietnam. “It raises the prospect in the minds of the troops that says, ‘Whatever we do, if we can get the folks back home behind us, maybe we can get let off.’”

Chief Gallagher’s lawyer, Timothy Parlatore, was surprised by the news that the president could be considering a pardon, and said ideally the chief would be acquitted at trial.

“We want the opportunity to exonerate my client,” Mr. Parlatore said in an interview. “At the same time, there is always a risk in going to trial. My primary objective is to get Chief Gallagher home to his family. To that end, Chief Gallagher would welcome any involvement by the president.”

Other than violating military law, the cases the president is said to be considering defy easy categorization.

Navy SEALs who served with Chief Gallagher told authorities he indiscriminately shot at civilians, gunning down a young woman in a flowered hijab and an unarmed old man. They also said he stabbed a teenage captive, then bragged about it in text messages. His trial is set to start at the end of this month. If convicted, he faces life in prison. He has pleaded not guilty and denies all charges.

Major Golsteyn is charged with killing an Afghan man that he and other soldiers said had bomb-making materials. After an interrogation, the soldiers let the man go. Fearing that the man would return to making improvised explosives, which had already killed two Marines in the area, Major Golsteyn later said he killed the man.

Mr. Trump has singled both men out on Twitter, calling Major Golsteyn a “U.S. Military hero,” and praising Chief Gallagher for his service to the country.

The Blackwater contractor, Nicholas A. Slatten, is one of several Blackwater contractors charged in the killing of 17 Iraqis and the wounding of 20 more on a Baghdad street. After a number of mistrials and other delays, he is the only one who has been convicted.

The Marines charged in urinating on the corpse of a Taliban fighter were caught after a video of the act was found.

The fact that the requests were sent from the White House to the Justice Department, instead of the other way around, is a reversal of long-established practices, said Margaret Love, who served as the United States pardon attorney during the first Bush administration and part of the Clinton administration.

Long ago, presidents wielded clemency power directly, Ms. Love said, but that changed at the end of the Civil War when President Lincoln delegated review of clemency requests to his attorney general. Since then, cases have generally been vetted by Justice Department lawyers before being sent to the president.

President Trump has upended that practice, often issuing pardons with little or no notice to the Justice Department, she said, adding that the fact the department is requesting files on men like Chief Gallagher at all suggests that Attorney General William P. Barr is trying to re-exert some authority over the process.

Process aside, she said that pardoning the men would be an abrupt departure from the past.

“Presidents use pardons to send messages. They recognize when a process wasn’t just or when punishments were too extreme, like for some nonviolent drug cases,” she said. “If this president is planning to pardon a bunch of people charged with war crimes, he will use the pardon power to send a far darker message.”


https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/18/us/trump-pardons-war-crimes.html

   



BartSimpson @ Mon May 20, 2019 11:03 am

$1:
The Marines charged in urinating on the corpse of a Taliban fighter were caught after a video of the act was found.


They were paying their proper respects. [B-o]

   



stratos @ Mon May 20, 2019 11:49 am

BartSimpson BartSimpson:
$1:
The Marines charged in urinating on the corpse of a Taliban fighter were caught after a video of the act was found.


They were paying their proper respects. [B-o]


Sounds like they were giving him the proper send off.

   



BartSimpson @ Mon May 20, 2019 1:26 pm

Indeed. Full military honors.

He got peed on by the military, right?

   



xerxes @ Mon May 20, 2019 3:57 pm

$1:
Navy SEALs who served with Chief Gallagher told authorities he indiscriminately shot at civilians, gunning down a young woman in a flowered hijab and an unarmed old man. They also said he stabbed a teenage captive, then bragged about it in text messages. His trial is set to start at the end of this month. If convicted, he faces life in prison. He has pleaded not guilty and denies all charges.


Pissings aside, is this conduct you'd approve of in the Marines, much less any branch of US armed forced?

   



Thanos @ Mon May 20, 2019 4:05 pm

Gotta look away from a lot of things that happen in war, like when the Marines in Fallujah mercy-killed some jihadis that were too badly wounded to survive. I'd even look the other way if someone had taken the old misericord to our pal Omar Khadr, "just to make sure he wasn't suffering". But when the other special forces guys, who are all mental tight-wires themselves, get concerned over some loon running a one-man einsatzgruppen on his own then that person shouldn't be pardoned from military justice. The Muslim enemy generally being much worse in their own actions is no excuse for a professional soldier to behave that way, even worse if he's a squad leader intimidating his own troops into keeping their mouths shut about what he's doing for amusement.

   



BartSimpson @ Mon May 20, 2019 4:16 pm

xerxes xerxes:
$1:
Navy SEALs who served with Chief Gallagher told authorities he indiscriminately shot at civilians, gunning down a young woman in a flowered hijab and an unarmed old man. They also said he stabbed a teenage captive, then bragged about it in text messages. His trial is set to start at the end of this month. If convicted, he faces life in prison. He has pleaded not guilty and denies all charges.


Pissings aside, is this conduct you'd approve of in the Marines, much less any branch of US armed forced?


Chief Gallagher was Navy. The Navy has a lot of conduct I'd never endorse in the Corps.

   



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