Canada Kicks Ass
français vs français canadien

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Cygnus @ Tue Sep 23, 2008 12:09 am

Au 17e et 18e siecle, on peut dire que 2 type de francais etais utilises, un formel et l' autre informel. Le francais informel est celui qui nous interesse. L'utilisation de ce francais etais moins encadrer par les regle stricte de l'epoque. Donc les nouveaux arrivant utilise cette variation de la langue et l'ont adapte pour repondre au besoin de leur nouvelle realite.

En 1760, Les britaniques ont isoles la Nouvelle-France de l'Europe Francais. Pendant cette periode la France a eu la revolution et la langue a changer beaucoup. Donc certain variation de la langue en france n'est pas acceptable.

En gros aujourd'hui les quebecois utilise une variante du francais informel de l'epoque de la Nouvelle-France.

Les Francais de France font tres attention a leur prononciation. Ce qui n'est pas toujours le cas pour les Quebecois. Mais en general, un Quebecois va tres bien comprendre un Francais (FRANCE) mais l'invers n'est pas toujours le cas.(experience personnelle)

   



Arctic_Menace @ Tue Sep 23, 2008 3:58 am

canadaftw canadaftw:
By proper all I meant was the type of French that they speak in France, which is the type I learned in my small town American high school :|


Well it's funny that you mention that, because Quebecois French actually more closely resembles proper French. ;) :P

It's actually the French over in France that have bastardized their own language. :P :lol:

   



martin14 @ Tue Sep 23, 2008 4:25 am

Cygnus Cygnus:
Au 17e et 18e siecle, on peut dire que 2 type de francais etais utilises, un formel et l' autre informel. Le francais informel est celui qui nous interesse. L'utilisation de ce francais etais moins encadrer par les regle stricte de l'epoque. Donc les nouveaux arrivant utilise cette variation de la langue et l'ont adapte pour repondre au besoin de leur nouvelle realite.

En 1760, Les britaniques ont isoles la Nouvelle-France de l'Europe Francais. Pendant cette periode la France a eu la revolution et la langue a changer beaucoup. Donc certain variation de la langue en france n'est pas acceptable.

En gros aujourd'hui les quebecois utilise une variante du francais informel de l'epoque de la Nouvelle-France.

Les Francais de France font tres attention a leur prononciation. Ce qui n'est pas toujours le cas pour les Quebecois. Mais en general, un Quebecois va tres bien comprendre un Francais (FRANCE) mais l'invers n'est pas toujours le cas.(experience personnelle)



interesting, i have had the exact opposite problem.
I can still watch news from Montreal and understand most if not
all of it, but my recent trip to France, understood maybe half the sentence.
Pronunciation is different, they have structures and expressions.
Maybe it is because French for mes a second language, not first.
And for me to speak with them.. ha ha ha ha ;)

Its the same everywhere, if people want to understand you, they will try.
The French in France are also pretty arrogant about speaking french 'correctly',
something I never found in Quebec.

Quebecois rules !! :rock: :rock:

   



Cygnus @ Tue Sep 23, 2008 8:39 pm

I had a trip in France and at one point I had to spell my last name because they did not understand it.
I can tell you the difference between my prononciation and theirs was very small.

In your case your use to quebec french and not french (FRANCE) that why

   



MacDonaill @ Thu Oct 16, 2008 6:52 pm

Arctic_Menace Arctic_Menace:
canadaftw canadaftw:
By proper all I meant was the type of French that they speak in France, which is the type I learned in my small town American high school :|


Well it's funny that you mention that, because Quebecois French actually more closely resembles proper French. ;) :P

It's actually the French over in France that have bastardized their own language. :P :lol:


That's the biggest load of bullshit.

There is a story saying that Quebec French resembles more the dialect of the pre-revolution aristocracy. That may be true, but that doesn't really mean much when you think that the same French spoken in France today also existed concurrently with the Quebec French of that time. It was the middle class dialect which became the acceptable standard in the French republic, and this was the language that the French exported to Belgium, Switzerland, Asia, Maghreb and other parts of Africa. It's the world standard today, and there is no question about it. Canadians make up 5% of the world's francophones. I think it's the other 95% that, at the end of the day, will be deciding which French is 'proper'.

   



Brenda @ Wed Dec 17, 2008 12:42 pm

Tegan Tegan:
canadaftw canadaftw:
By proper all I meant was the type of French that they speak in France, which is the type I learned in my small town American high school :|


Unfortunately there is a difference between textbook French and spoken French in any location, not just Québec.

That goes for any language.

   



FireWire @ Wed Dec 17, 2008 1:20 pm

Arctic_Menace Arctic_Menace:

Nope. In Quebec, they would've said: "Tabarnac..." :P


I laughed when Justin Timberland said it in the Guru movie! So hilarious!

   



Brenda @ Wed Dec 17, 2008 1:40 pm

Tegan Tegan:
Brenda Brenda:
Tegan Tegan:
Unfortunately there is a difference between textbook French and spoken French in any location, not just Québec.

That goes for any language.


Certainly true, but for some reason the gap is often wider in French. Schools tend to teach several French languages, depending on the language in the learning program and the varieties of French spoken by the teachers. There are a large number of countries in the world that have French as one of their official languages and French teachers are not necessarily from France.

I was taught 4 languages in school, none of the teachers was from the country of the language they taught.

I don't agree with your statement that "the gap is often wider in French". Just look at English...

   



Brenda @ Wed Dec 17, 2008 2:31 pm

Tegan Tegan:
I was taught 4 languages in school, none of the teachers was from the country of the language they taught.

I don't agree with your statement that "the gap is often wider in French". Just look at English... from Brenda


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I was taught 5 and they were from countries that spoke the languages.

I can't say that I have met an anglophone who spoke completely incomprehensible English. I did however meet a francophone from Corsica, a part of France, and could barely understand a word of his French.


dialect?

Have you ever heard the difference between English English, Australian English, US English, Scottish English, Canadian English... (do you seriously want me to go on?)

The teachers that teach you a foreign language don't need to be from a native country. They need to be taught correctly at Uni.

I could teach you Dutch. No problem. It doesn't mean you will be fluent, or without an accent. They speak Dutch in South Africa... It is COMPLETELY different from Dutch Dutch. Same goes for Suriname, or even Flanders (Dutch Belgium).

   



Choban @ Wed Dec 17, 2008 5:56 pm

In a nutshell.... Fringlish
Words such as toaster, F#$k ect...

   



Brenda @ Wed Dec 17, 2008 5:58 pm

OMG... Anglophones are native speakers of English... Gosh, I didn't know that! 8O
:roll:

You try to prove me wrong, but at the same time you are saying the same thing.

Believe me, the Northern French do not understand the Southern French.
There are several varieties of Dutch (like I mentioned before) as well as German. People in Austria should speak German, but wow, it is VERY hard to understand them!

EVERY teacher is influenced by what they have been taught. Have you seen here on the board many people that are flawless in English? Spelling, grammar, anything? What would make them a better English teacher than (for example...) I would be, taught at Uni? And what makes you think my curriculum would be different from an Anglophones?

   



PJB @ Wed Dec 17, 2008 6:37 pm

I remember learning Parisian French in High School only to go to Quebec and try to speak French and having people look at me like I was talking gibberish! Quebecois is a bastardized French plain and simple.

   



Brenda @ Wed Dec 17, 2008 6:39 pm

Tegan Tegan:
Actually, an difference in opinion on this is rather minor.

Moreover, I would hope that your curriculum in teaching English would be different from an Anglophones, assuming you are not one. I would certainly hope that it would be better, since you have the experience of learning English as a Second Language.

I am not an Anglophone, that is correct.
By the time I would attend University to become an English teacher, I should be able to follow the curriculum offered, don't you think?

FYI... My children, who didn't speak one word of English this time last year, did not get the help of an ESL teacher in school. Their English is good enough to follow the classes they are taught.

Anyway, if I would be teaching English, why would the curriculum I would offer be better than that of the rest of the teachers? I would have had the same education,or I would not have been hired.

   



lachapelle8 @ Tue Oct 20, 2009 11:57 pm

c'est la difference de l'access je pense :wink:





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