Canada Kicks Ass
The Hidden Price of Food from China

REPLY

Previous  1  2  3  Next



andyt @ Sat Oct 20, 2012 2:29 pm

Big article in the G&M about Chines buying land in the praries for speculation purposes. (Not sure if these were citizens or Chinese enationals).

What is RM?

Our rulers won't care. They'll get their cut, who cares if the plebes have jobs.

Same deal with the Coal mines we're opening here in BC. All imported Chinesw labor, because "Canadians aren't trained for that kind of work." What, were the Chinese born knowing how to coal mine? If they can train people in second world China, why can't we do it in first world Canada? How long are we going to stay first world anyway?

   



Jonny_C @ Sat Oct 20, 2012 3:36 pm

xerxes xerxes:
Johnny. Take it from someone who packages the food you see in your supermarket, a lot of the products that "packaged in Canada" can still contain some products from China. Especially if you buy at places like Loblaw's.


Yes, xerxes, I try to watch for that distinction. I try to watch for "Made in" or "Product of". With "Packaged in" or "Packed for" you don't know what you're getting.

There are some that are even harder to figure out. For example, Costco sells a Kirkland brand garlic that says "Granulated California Garlic" but the back reads "Packed in USA". It's still doubtful.

   



andyt @ Sat Oct 20, 2012 4:09 pm

$1:
The current rules provide three categories for Canadian "food nationality." These are defined by the parts of the supply chain, the factories and/or farms, that are actually in Canada.

The way the system works is that products in the lowest category received only nominal processing here, and the label simply notes this.

Michael J Armstrong teaches quality management in the faculty of business at Brock University.

A label for jam might state, for example, "Packaged in Canada" if the jam was produced in bulk in the U.S. but placed into jars in Ontario.

The higher "Made in Canada" category applies where a Canadian factory does the key processing.

For example, jam labels might read "Made in Canada from domestic and imported ingredients" if an Ontario jam factory used berries from New Brunswick and cane sugar from the Caribbean. This allows Canadian factories to receive credit for their work, regardless of where the ingredients come from.

The most demanding designation is "Product of Canada." This only applies when the factory lies within Canada and at least 98 per cent of the ingredients come from here, too. This is the designation that much of the current fuss is about.



EG an ice cream maker using imported sugar and chocolate still wants to call her stuff product of Canada. Ridiculous,

   



ShepherdsDog @ Sat Oct 20, 2012 5:46 pm

$1:
What is RM?

rural municipality

As for using imported chocolate, that's going to kill the domestic chocolate market isn't it....all those Canadian growers put out of work in............. [huh]....??

   



fifeboy @ Sat Oct 20, 2012 7:00 pm

andyt andyt:

What is RM?
Rural Municipality. Headed by a Reeve who is like a country mayor.

   



ShepherdsDog @ Sat Oct 20, 2012 7:53 pm

Or a county commissioner in the states.

   



EyeBrock @ Sat Oct 20, 2012 7:56 pm

Does any good news come out of China? It appears not.

   



DrCaleb @ Mon Oct 22, 2012 10:55 am

Costco sells mushrooms 'Product of China'. And Garlic. I don't buy them, I swear that the muchrooms went mouldy on the way home from buying them. I can get better produce at the local oranic store or Farmers market.

And it's not just products from China. Costco also used to sell some canned pink grapefruit from South Africa that were very yummy, but came with a special surprise!

Explosive Diarrhea.png
Explosive Diarrhea.png [ 283.67 KiB | Viewed 239 times ]

   



herbie @ Mon Oct 22, 2012 8:15 pm

Canned grapefruit? You deserved it boy!
Reminds me of Dole Canned pineapple that gave my sweet & sour lovely burnt matches overtones. Turns out pineapple is high sulfur and they even use SO2 to make it last longer.
Who cares if the fruit tastes like shit or the popcorn burns your lungs out? We got PROFIT MARGINS to maintain here!

   



xerxes @ Mon Oct 22, 2012 8:29 pm

Are we really surprised though? At some point point we're going to have to accept this as a fait accompli of our modern world.

Do we want to be able to have bananas and fresh fruit all year round? Then it's going to have to come from places with lower production standards or its not going to be of the highest quality. It's the nature of economies of scale. We can feed all the people on this planet without cutting standards somewhere.

Strawberries in early spring? Picked green in California and shipped north for processing the day before they hit the shelves in the supermarket.

Raspberries come from Chile the same way.

The same with packages of frozen vegetables. I have seen 5 year old spinach packaged with an additional 18 month expiry date.

   



Gunnair @ Mon Oct 22, 2012 8:46 pm

xerxes xerxes:
Are we really surprised though? At some point point we're going to have to accept this as a fait accompli of our modern world.

Do we want to be able to have bananas and fresh fruit all year round? Then it's going to have to come from places with lower production standards or its not going to be of the highest quality. It's the nature of economies of scale. We can feed all the people on this planet without cutting standards somewhere.

Strawberries in early spring? Picked green in California and shipped north for processing the day before they hit the shelves in the supermarket.

Raspberries come from Chile the same way.

The same with packages of frozen vegetables. I have seen 5 year old spinach packaged with an additional 18 month expiry date.


Yep.

When I was a kid, most of our winter fruit came from the summer canning.

   



ShepherdsDog @ Mon Oct 22, 2012 9:00 pm

That's one of the things I will miss from here. The availability and range of cheap fresh fruit. Strawberry season starts in December, as do the local oranges. Jujubes will also be coming into season too. There are only a few local fruits I'm not crazy about, guava and dragon fruit being the two main ones. One is bland, while guava is just vile.

As for canned fruit....I love canned crab apples [drool] Most of the canned fruit we had was in the form of jams and jellies, the rest was frozen. Homemade cranberry, raspberry, chokecherry, currant, plum strawberry and rhubarb jams and jellies(saskatoons ...no)., apple butter One of the first dishes I plan on having when i get home is stewed rhubarb

   



bootlegga @ Tue Oct 23, 2012 8:21 am

xerxes xerxes:
Are we really surprised though? At some point point we're going to have to accept this as a fait accompli of our modern world.

Do we want to be able to have bananas and fresh fruit all year round? Then it's going to have to come from places with lower production standards or its not going to be of the highest quality. It's the nature of economies of scale. We can feed all the people on this planet without cutting standards somewhere.

Strawberries in early spring? Picked green in California and shipped north for processing the day before they hit the shelves in the supermarket.

Raspberries come from Chile the same way.

The same with packages of frozen vegetables. I have seen 5 year old spinach packaged with an additional 18 month expiry date.


Yep, that's why we can get grapes in February - that's they are ready in Chile.

As bad as all this sounds, it's far better from when I was a kid and it was either canned fruit or mushy apples all winter long.

I just buy fresh fruit and wash it thoroughly. Hopefully that is better for me than all the preservatives and other shit they put in processed/canned food nowadays.

I'll take my chances with third world fruit and veggies, thank you. If you don't want to eat it, then don't - no one is forcing you to.

   



2Cdo @ Tue Oct 23, 2012 8:26 am

bootlegga bootlegga:

Yep, that's why we can get grapes in February - that's they are ready in Chile.

As bad as all this sounds, it's far better from when I was a kid and it was either canned fruit or mushy apples all winter long.

I just buy fresh fruit and wash it thoroughly. Hopefully that is better for me than all the preservatives and other shit they put in processed/canned food nowadays.

I'll take my chances with third world fruit and veggies, thank you. If you don't want to eat it, then don't - no one is forcing you to.


Exactly. But that being said I usually spend alot of time doing canning in the fall with veggies and fruit from the garden. This year being so warm and dry, NONE of my apple trees bore any fruit. :(

Also, I can't grow bananas here(yet)or any other tropical fruit.

   



bootlegga @ Tue Oct 23, 2012 8:49 am

2Cdo 2Cdo:
bootlegga bootlegga:

Yep, that's why we can get grapes in February - that's they are ready in Chile.

As bad as all this sounds, it's far better from when I was a kid and it was either canned fruit or mushy apples all winter long.

I just buy fresh fruit and wash it thoroughly. Hopefully that is better for me than all the preservatives and other shit they put in processed/canned food nowadays.

I'll take my chances with third world fruit and veggies, thank you. If you don't want to eat it, then don't - no one is forcing you to.


Exactly. But that being said I usually spend alot of time doing canning in the fall with veggies and fruit from the garden. This year being so warm and dry, NONE of my apple trees bore any fruit. :(

Also, I can't grow bananas here(yet)or any other tropical fruit.


That sucks - my new Honeycrisp Apple tree had about three dozen apples on it - and it's only 6 feet tall and three wide! I'm scared about its production when it reaches maturity (15-20 ft tall and 8-10 ft wide)! :lol:

My garden did really well too this year - I picked ripe strawberries off it last weekend! Our tomatoes and cucumbers pumped out a lot too, although our corn didn't do as well as I hoped. Still, what it did make was super sweet and delicious.

And yeah, if you want Bananas, pineapples, etc, they only come from tropical/sub-tropical climates. Fortunately, Hawaii produces a lot of them, so we don't have to worry too much about the quality of that fruit.

   



REPLY

Previous  1  2  3  Next