Canada Kicks Ass
Canada Police Misconduct Reports

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DrCaleb @ Tue Jun 23, 2020 9:40 am

I think the first step in all of this is to define "Wellness Check" for police. Apparently, there is some confusion.

   



Scape @ Tue Jun 23, 2020 3:51 pm

Investigation launched into video of Mountie dragging B.C. woman during mental health crisis: RCMP

   



DrCaleb @ Wed Jun 24, 2020 9:58 am

bootlegga bootlegga:
If you watch the full video I posted above, Chief Adam does push the taller of the officers (who was doing a good job of de-escalating the situation IMHO) after the officer manhandles Allan's wife, but there is nothing in my opinion to warrant such a violent takedown by the second officer at the end of the video.


Charges expected to be dropped against Alberta First Nation Chief Allan Adam

   



Zipperfish @ Wed Jun 24, 2020 10:36 am

DrCaleb DrCaleb:
bootlegga bootlegga:
If you watch the full video I posted above, Chief Adam does push the taller of the officers (who was doing a good job of de-escalating the situation IMHO) after the officer manhandles Allan's wife, but there is nothing in my opinion to warrant such a violent takedown by the second officer at the end of the video.


Charges expected to be dropped against Alberta First Nation Chief Allan Adam


Probably "Resisting arrest" needs to be examined. Seems to be the go-to whenever there are no actual substantive charges available. Also, the advent of monitoring technology has revealed that police lie--a lot. The basis of the police system in the courts was always based on the fact that the police could be trusted, because, unlike the perp, they were not personally invested. For a speeding ticket, of course the perp would lie out of self-interest, but that was not the case with the cop, the argument went.

So that made "resisting arrest" charges a slam dunk, before the advent of widespread video evidence, because it would boil down to he-said-she said.

   



DrCaleb @ Wed Jun 24, 2020 10:39 am

Zipperfish Zipperfish:
So that made "resisting arrest" charges a slam dunk, before the advent of widespread video evidence, because it would boil down to he-said-she said.


In the US, prosecutors have become wise to this. Many won't pursue charges of resisting arrest if there are no other charges. What would they have been arrested for?

Same with Chief Adam. Having an expired license tag isn't arrestable, so what was he resisting?

   



DrCaleb @ Wed Jun 24, 2020 11:27 am

Charges dropped against First Nations Chief Allan Adam in violent arrest

   



Scape @ Wed Jun 24, 2020 5:37 pm

   



DrCaleb @ Fri Jun 26, 2020 6:32 am

RCMP investigating why criminal charges against officer in Chief Allan Adam’s arrest weren’t disclosed

   



DrCaleb @ Fri Jun 26, 2020 10:30 am

$1:
Woman in Nanaimo, B.C., claims police wellness check left her with serious injuries

Image

Shanna Blanchard was having an emotional argument with her 21-year-old son at her Nanaimo, B.C., home on Vancouver Island one afternoon in late May, when she decided to lock herself in the bathroom.

"I've been struggling with depression through COVID," said Blanchard. "[I] lay on the floor and cried and cried and cried and cried —I was really upset."

When she refused to answer her son or leave the bathroom, he called 911.

The police wellness check that followed left Blanchard's nose broken, teeth damaged and her ribs bruised, she alleges.

Island District RCMP said it couldn't comment on the case — it has been taken over by the Independent Investigations Office of B.C. (IIOBC).

Blanchard is now speaking out about her story a month later because she thinks police should not be the people responding to calls for mental health wellness checks.



https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british- ... -1.5628037

   



BartSimpson @ Fri Jun 26, 2020 2:18 pm

$1:
The police wellness check that followed left Blanchard's nose broken, teeth damaged and her ribs bruised,


That was NOT a 'wellness check'.

   



DrCaleb @ Mon Jun 29, 2020 8:08 am

$1:
Edmonton police officer admits using force on man with mental health issues

A constable with the Edmonton Police Service admitted he used inappropriate force against a man with mental health issues in 2017.

At a hearing held by teleconference Thursday, Binoy Prabhu pleaded guilty to discreditable conduct and inappropriate use of force under the police act.

The victim said he decided to speak out about what happened after watching the hearing remotely.

"I want to do this so that in the future, people with mental disabilities or mental problems can get treated better by the police," Tyler Lychak, 30, told CBC News Thursday. "I believe that training is necessary to save lives."

Lychak's ordeal began on Nov. 3, 2017, when he went to the west Edmonton police station to report concerns about someone who may have been selling drugs to minors.

A civilian at the front counter said Lychak would have to call in the complaint himself.

"Lychak was upset," presenting officer Derek Cranna, representing the police chief, told the disciplinary hearing. "As he exited the station, his foot hit one of the sliding doors and dislodged it. There was a loud noise."

Prabhu and a fellow officer followed Lychak to the parking lot where there was an argument.

Lychak was arrested for mischief, placed in handcuffs and escorted back into the police station. The officers took him into a holding cell and searched him, finding a can of bear spray. That led to a possession of a weapon charge.

Lychak said he was frightened.

"You started hyperventilating and stated you were scared of Const. Prabhu, then backed towards that wall," Chief Dale McFee wrote in a letter to Lychak summarizing the allegations.

Lychak was escorted to a telephone room to make a call.

What happened next was captured on police station closed-circuit cameras.

"At the entrance to the phone room, Const. Prabhu grabbed on his upper right arm or shirt and pulled him with enough force that he went to the ground," Cranna told the disciplinary hearing.

Lychak told investigating officers he hit his head on the wall and suffered bruising to his hip and back along with soreness to his neck and shoulder.

"There was no need to exercise force," Cranna said. "He [Prabhu] acknowledged he used inappropriate force that was in excess of what was necessary in the circumstances."

After the phone room door was closed, Lychak called 911 and asked for help.

"He said he was having a panic attack," Cranna said. "That police were not helping him and he was being beaten."



https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton ... -1.5629439

   



Scape @ Mon Jun 29, 2020 1:07 pm

DrCaleb DrCaleb:
$1:
Woman in Nanaimo, B.C., claims police wellness check left her with serious injuries

Image

Shanna Blanchard was having an emotional argument with her 21-year-old son at her Nanaimo, B.C., home on Vancouver Island one afternoon in late May, when she decided to lock herself in the bathroom.

"I've been struggling with depression through COVID," said Blanchard. "[I] lay on the floor and cried and cried and cried and cried —I was really upset."

When she refused to answer her son or leave the bathroom, he called 911.

The police wellness check that followed left Blanchard's nose broken, teeth damaged and her ribs bruised, she alleges.

Island District RCMP said it couldn't comment on the case — it has been taken over by the Independent Investigations Office of B.C. (IIOBC).

Blanchard is now speaking out about her story a month later because she thinks police should not be the people responding to calls for mental health wellness checks.



https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british- ... -1.5628037

Video:

   



DrCaleb @ Tue Jul 07, 2020 10:46 am

Advocates call for firings after video shows Saskatoon officers punching suspect on the ground

   



DrCaleb @ Wed Jul 08, 2020 7:49 am

$1:
Edmonton police officers investigated for use of force in pair of arrests

Jamie-Dean Sauter dropped by a downtown Edmonton Circle K convenience store one day in May to buy a cold drink and some breath mints.

It turned out to be one of the worst decisions he ever made.

While he was standing at the drink machine, six police officers rushed into the store and headed straight for him.

Sauter has filed a formal complaint with the Edmonton Police Service professional standards branch over the way he was treated.

"The officers seemed agitated and angry, and I heard them just yell out, 'That's him,'" he said.

Sauter, 37, said one officer grabbed his arm and told him he was under arrest for possession of a stolen vehicle. He insisted that was impossible, and told them to check his identification, vehicle registration and insurance.

Instead he was slammed to the floor.

"Several officers began to pile up on me," Sauter told CBC News. "They began to grab my hands and placed them into handcuffs."

He said he was kneed in the side as police grabbed his feet to hogtie him, and was punched in the face.

A customer in the store captured video of the incident on his cellphone.

"I had kind of a bad feeling in general that maybe this guy is in the wrong place at the wrong time," Joshua Powell said. "He sounded innocent to me, so I just naturally took out my phone and started recording."

On the video, Sauter is heard angrily saying, "You punched me in the face. You just punched me in the face."

He said the attack continued as another officer removed his hat, grabbed the back of his hair and slammed his head four times against the floor. After that, an officer placed his boot on Sauter's cheek.

"He took his boot and proceeded to wipe the bottom of his boot over my face," Sauter said. "It was very slow and deliberate. It was the most humiliating, disgusting thing.

"The takedown and everything was one thing," Sauter tearfully recalled. "But it felt like he was making me aware I was less than dirt under his boot. I wasn't even human."

. . .

After Sauter complained about being punched in the face, Powell said on tape, "That was a bit excessive, as an outside perspective."

In hindsight, Powell thinks the police were offended by his criticism and decided to teach him a lesson. He said one officer approached him and said, "When they tell you to stay back, you stay back."

The officer then tried to grab his phone as Powell was being pushed up against the drink machine.

"My hoodie gets ripped over my head, and all I can remember is multiple officers swarming," Powell said. "It's almost like they came from him to deal with me, you know?"

On the video Powell said, "What are you doing to me?" as the screen goes black.

Powell was eventually charged with obstruction of justice. His arrest is also being investigated by the professional standards branch.

His girlfriend was sitting outside the Circle K store in a vehicle and saw him being carried out of the store.

. . .

"I can't imagine a Crown prosecutor taking this to trial," Tom Engel said. "It might sound surprising to say this, but the police officers kidnapped him and unlawfully confined him. Those are serious criminal offences."

The lawyer also questioned the size of the police response that night.

"If you can amass 15 or so officers to deal with what was allegedly a stolen licence plate, there's obviously too much money in the EPS budget," Engel said.

. . .

He was never criminally charged. Police determined his licence plate had been stolen and replaced with one from a stolen vehicle.



https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton ... -1.5640970

   



DrCaleb @ Tue Jul 14, 2020 7:52 am

$1:
Alberta police watchdog to investigate if Lethbridge officers broke law in surveilling former minister

Alberta's police watchdog has been directed to investigate whether there was criminal behaviour in the case of two Lethbridge police officers who have been suspended, after admitting to unauthorized surveillance of former Alberta environment minister Shannon Phillips in 2017.

The two followed and photographed the minister during and after a meeting about NDP plans to increase environmental protections in the Castle region of southwest Alberta.

Both officers were involved in the off-roading community, whose members were upset by NDP plans to restrict off-road vehicle use in the environmentally sensitive area.

Sgt. Jason Carrier and Const. Keon Woronuk were temporarily demoted following a disciplinary hearing decision issued June 9, which was first reported by Medicine Hat's CHAT News Today on Monday.

Discreditable conduct, acts of deceit

The disciplinary hearing found multiple breaches of police regulations. The penalty decision accused the officers of "using your position as a police officer for your personal advantage or another person's advantage" and included charges of corrupt practice, discreditable conduct and acts of deceit.

Justice Minister Doug Schweitzer expressed his shock via Twitter on Monday evening, saying he was previously unaware of the incident and that the government was not involved in the professional standards investigation.

He said the Alberta Serious Incident Response Team has been directed to review that investigation to determine if there are grounds for a criminal investigation.

"To say it is completely unacceptable that members of the police would conduct unauthorized surveillance of any Albertan — in particular an elected official — is an understatement," he said.



https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/ ... -1.5648423

   



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