Canada Kicks Ass
Omnibus COVID-19 virus discussion thread

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Scape @ Wed Jan 12, 2022 5:33 pm

AT&T directly funded stop the steal so yes.

Google Is Fined $57 Million Under Europe’s Data Privacy Law

$1:
LONDON — After European policymakers adopted a sweeping data privacy law last year, the big question was how regulators would use their newfound authority against the most powerful technology companies.

In the first major example, the French data protection authority announced Monday that it had fined Google 50 million euros, or about $57 million, for not properly disclosing to users how data is collected across its services — including its search engine, Google Maps and YouTube — to present personalized advertisements.

The penalty is the largest to date under the European Union privacy law, known as the General Data Protection Regulation, which took effect in May, and shows that regulators are following through on a pledge to use the rules to push back against internet companies whose businesses depend on collecting data. Facebook is also a subject of several investigations by the data protection authorities in Europe.

The ruling signals a new phase in enforcing the European law, which the region’s lawmakers and privacy groups have cheered as a check against the growing power of technology companies, while for general consumers it has led mostly to a frustrating increase in the number of consent boxes to click. The fine against Google is just the fourth penalty against any company since the law took effect.

Europe’s experience is being closely watched by policymakers in the United States, who are considering a new federal privacy law. Tim Cook, Apple’s chief executive officer, last week called for new rules that closely follow Europe’s.

Europe has become the world’s most aggressive tech watchdog. In addition to the privacy rules, the region’s regulators have set the bar with stricter enforcement of antitrust laws against Google and other tech behemoths and taken a tougher stance against the industry’s tax policies. Google, a frequent target, was fined a record €4.3 billion last year for abusing its power in the mobile phone market.

The ruling on Monday takes aim at Google’s business model, which turns data on users into narrowly targeted ads.

A central element of Europe’s new regulations is that companies must clearly explain how data is collected and used. France’s data protection regulator, known as CNIL, said Google did not go far enough to get consent from users before processing data. Instead, it said, people are largely unaware of the data they are agreeing to share, or how Google plans to use the information.

In a statement, the regulator said Google’s practices obscured how its services “can reveal important parts of their private life since they are based on a huge amount of data, a wide variety of services and almost unlimited possible combinations.”

Google’s size — it has about 20 different services — makes its data-collection practices “particularly massive and intrusive,” the French authorities said.

Google defended its policies and said it was determining whether to appeal.

“People expect high standards of transparency and control from us,” a Google spokesman said. “We’re deeply committed to meeting those expectations and the consent requirements of the G.D.P.R. We’re studying the decision to determine our next steps.”

The case against Google stemmed from a complaint filed by privacy groups that accused the search giant of not properly adjusting its data-collection practices to account for Europe’s stricter privacy rules.

“A lot of U.S. companies have dumped everything they do in a consent box and have people waive their rights,” said Max Schrems, an Austrian lawyer who founded NOYB, one of the groups that filed the complaint, and is a longtime antagonist of American tech giants over data collection.

“No one who reads it understands,” he added. “I don’t know what they do with my data, and I’m a lawyer.”

Raphaël Dana, a partner at the Paris law firm Frieh Associés who specializes in privacy law, said Silicon Valley companies should expect more penalties across Europe as a result of the data protection law.

“This is going to change the perspective between the profits that internet companies are able to make from the data of users, and the risk of being sanctioned with fines,” Mr. Dana said.

The fine announced on Monday is far lower than the maximum penalty under the European privacy law, which is 4 percent of global revenue. For Google, that would be more than $4 billion.

“The fine is immaterial,” said Johnny Ryan, the chief policy and industry relations officer at the web browser Brave. “But CNIL’s decision is very significant because it means that Google must stop building advertising profiles about people until it has properly told them what it is doing and received their consent.”

Mr. Ryan said the risk to Google was that people would be startled to see how their data was used.

“It is likely that many people will say no to being profiled by Google when they learn the truth,” he said.


I beg to differ.

   



Scape @ Wed Jan 12, 2022 5:36 pm

Provinces ‘right’ to explore vaccination incentives, Trudeau says, as Quebec plans anti-vax tax

because the results are plain to see:

Thousands sign up for 1st dose of COVID-19 vaccine as Quebec threatens to tax the unvaxxed

   



Gunnair @ Wed Jan 12, 2022 5:48 pm

Scape Scape:
Provinces ‘right’ to explore vaccination incentives, Trudeau says, as Quebec plans anti-vax tax

because the results are plain to see:

Thousands sign up for 1st dose of COVID-19 vaccine as Quebec threatens to tax the unvaxxed


Man, I admit I am thoroughly against an anti-vax tax, but you can't ignore those numbers.

   



Scape @ Wed Jan 12, 2022 5:53 pm

Just as my foot can go up the ass with the proper amount of force so to can vax get in the arms of the reticent with the correct incentive. Shame it had to come to this.

   



CDN_PATRIOT @ Wed Jan 12, 2022 6:23 pm

Scape Scape:
Shame it had to come to this.


Mass distrust will do that. Sad, but true. No one trusts anyone, and a lot of people certainly don't trust elites in any shape or form.

That being said, even though I personally don't trust the elites as far as I can throw them, I got the first two shots. Distrust runs much deeper for some.

-J.

   



Strutz @ Wed Jan 12, 2022 6:44 pm

Scape Scape:
Provinces ‘right’ to explore vaccination incentives, Trudeau says, as Quebec plans anti-vax tax

because the results are plain to see:

Thousands sign up for 1st dose of COVID-19 vaccine as Quebec threatens to tax the unvaxxed

So it amounts to lighting a fire under people's asses to get the shot(s).

   



Scape @ Wed Jan 12, 2022 8:37 pm

   



DrCaleb @ Thu Jan 13, 2022 5:30 am

Scape Scape:
AT&T directly funded stop the steal so yes.


That wasn't the question.

Scape Scape:
Google Is Fined $57 Million Under Europe’s Data Privacy Law


Nothing to do with misinformation, like I wrote.

Scape Scape:
I beg to differ.


Differ all you like. ISPs are not content creators, and redesigning the Internet to make them capable of censoring content will break the internet.

   



DrCaleb @ Thu Jan 13, 2022 7:56 am

Study Finds Cannabis Compounds Prevent Infection By Covid-19 Virus


Is there anything that Cannabis can't do? 8)

   



Zipperfish @ Thu Jan 13, 2022 9:01 am

Scape Scape:
Provinces ‘right’ to explore vaccination incentives, Trudeau says, as Quebec plans anti-vax tax

because the results are plain to see:

Thousands sign up for 1st dose of COVID-19 vaccine as Quebec threatens to tax the unvaxxed


There's a lot of precedence here--it's basically a sin tax, like booze, smokes and pot.

The numbers bear looking at though--the health minister said they were the "highest in days." Is it kids getting vaccinated though? Other factors?

   



Zipperfish @ Thu Jan 13, 2022 9:02 am

DrCaleb DrCaleb:
Scape Scape:
I beg to differ.


Differ all you like. ISPs are not content creators, and redesigning the Internet to make them capable of censoring content will break the internet.


You say that like it's a bad thing.

   



DrCaleb @ Thu Jan 13, 2022 10:00 am

Zipperfish Zipperfish:
DrCaleb DrCaleb:
Scape Scape:
I beg to differ.


Differ all you like. ISPs are not content creators, and redesigning the Internet to make them capable of censoring content will break the internet.


You say that like it's a bad thing.


It is. The Internet was designed to survive a nuclear war. It has redundancies that route around problems. Dictatorships like Iran and China redesign their connections to the Internet so that they route through a single point, so that data can be filtered and blocked. Data that they don't like. And it makes for a single point to surveille their population too.

Making Canadian ISPs reroute the internet so they can block sites like Facebook will not only be expensive, but will be a tempting limit to free speech. Not to mention what the surveillance state will do with that opportunity.

If it's Facebook and Google that people want to limit - then do that. Leave the edge connectors alone. There are many parts of the internet that have done nothing wrong. Like here. :idea:

   



raydan @ Thu Jan 13, 2022 11:00 am

Zipperfish Zipperfish:
Scape Scape:


There's a lot of precedence here--it's basically a sin tax, like booze, smokes and pot.

The numbers bear looking at though--the health minister said they were the "highest in days." Is it kids getting vaccinated though? Other factors?

I was checking the appointment application on Monday and things were crazy on the site... time slots and even full days disappearing as fast as I could book one for my booster.

   



raydan @ Thu Jan 13, 2022 11:07 am

Image

   



Scape @ Thu Jan 13, 2022 2:26 pm

DrCaleb DrCaleb:
ISPs are not content creators, and redesigning the Internet to make them capable of censoring content will break the internet.


$1:
You say that like it's a bad thing.


$1:
It is. The Internet was designed to survive a nuclear war. It has redundancies that route around problems. Dictatorships like Iran and China redesign their connections to the Internet so that they route through a single point, so that data can be filtered and blocked. Data that they don't like. And it makes for a single point to surveille their population too.

Making Canadian ISPs reroute the internet so they can block sites like Facebook will not only be expensive, but will be a tempting limit to free speech. Not to mention what the surveillance state will do with that opportunity.

If it's Facebook and Google that people want to limit - then do that. Leave the edge connectors alone. There are many parts of the internet that have done nothing wrong. Like here. :idea:



Looking just at the nuts and bolts of the technology you are correct but the access to commercial access is not the same thing as the internet itself. We are not talking about that, as it would be impractical. We are talking about having ISP subject to a CODE OF CODUCT similar to what our national broadcasters have already in place. We can't have rules for thee except for me when it comes to the internet. We can't block independent isp's even though they share the same backbone as the major ISP's but we can, as other countries around the would have, make them subject to laws of the land they reside in.

We can go after the major tech companies directly, such as google Facebook et al but at the end of the day are the Canadian companies? We need to look at our own backyard 1st.

   



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